Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

Legion Proverbs

A Dozen Good Ways to Say What You Mean And Mean What you Say.

Ambrath clasped the forearm of his Primus tightly with his left hand, while placing his right hand over his breast. Primus Jarius mimicked the gesture. Neither man said a word. They released their grips and Ambrath headed north, alone along the desolate road, while Primus Jarius turned south and back towards his besieged encampment. Dawn had only just touched the horizon.

“Ambrath.” Jarius called out softly, and was surprised to see his compatriot in arms turn at the whisper. Jarius held out his arm, his hand splayed as if to enwrap Ambrath in the distance. “Fortune and Glory.” he whispered.

Ambrath nodded once, solemnly and answered “Strength and Honor.” in an equally quiet voice. He then turned on a booted heel and began to run the length of the road.

Jarius could not help but watch his fastest solder until he disappeared from view around the bend. Jarius hefted his shortsword, and glanced back tword his encampment. “May we both live to see the next dawn.” he wished quietly. Heavy feet dragged him back to what would be another day of waiting, followed by an other night of fighting.

The Thardic Republican Army is a new institution, one linked to the glory of the Ancient Corani Empire and better days in most Thardic minds. The proverbs most commonly used by legionnaires also come from this time. Using them provides the comfort of knowing that such situations have happened before and were survived. To the legionnaire, these sayings allow them to express grief, worry and other emotions that do not fit their self-imposed image of the brave and the strong defenders of the Republic.

For the most part, the sayings are of Halean bent, and relate either to wealth or luck - two important aspects of the legionnaire’s life. A few Thardians, those with the most dealings with them, also use these sayings - but not as much. While they may sound cryptic to non Thardic ears, their use is rarely considered religious nor should they be taken as a sign of religious affectation. Instead they are common sayings and are not seen as breaking the taboo of speaking of one’s religion in public.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

The First Coin

Common Definition

It’s not a monetary reference so much as a reference to the first of the Seven Coins of Halea. According to the religious doctrine, the first coin of any money earned is paid in tithe to the temple of Halea for “all wealth flows from the maiden.” It is the simple way of wishing good luck in a hopeless task.

History Of The Proverb

No one is certain when, exactly this initial wish for Halea’s blessing turned from a general wish to a prayer for one’s soul. Most assume it has something to do with legionnaire’s frequent use of the saying.

Most legionnaires use it to refer to duties paid to others without immediate benefit. Legionnaires use the sayings as a reasoning for performing duties for others, specifically dangerous ones with no discernible value for themselves. It is also used when referring to personal or social sacrifice.

Non-legionnaires tend to use it when speaking of a profit-less venture. The habit of using it to describe an act done because it is the right thing to do, has been replaced by situations that are more dire than just morally-obligating.

When Do You Use It

Wishing someone “the coin” is considered very bad luck unless they have already promised themselves to the task at hand. Never used idly, or in jest, it is more commonly said at a grave side than to the living.

How Do You Use It

Sometimes this saying is shortened to “the coin” or “for the coin”. Examples:

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

Sardura

Common Definition

Invoking the princess of the Golden Wrath is to call down the rage of the Heaven of Pleasures. It is a promise of retribution at its nicest and revenge at this worst. Calling on Sardura in vain is said to be dangerous for she is a handmaiden of a very fickle force.

History Of The Proverb

Normally speaking a goddesses’s name aloud is a dangerous thing in Thardic society. Sardura is an exception to the rule because she is seen as regularly intervening in the acts of Thardians. She is believed by most Thardians to be the only force that keeps most merchants honest and most bargains intact.

The legion sees her as vengeance personified, which fits perfectly within their martial view of the world. She is the embodiment of their right to attack, or defend - as the need arises. Invoking her name causes no hardship so long as one is in the right.

Non-legionnaires tend to avoid invoking her name, just in case they are somehow in the wrong. The legionnaire’s use of the word as a curse or an epitath is seen as vulgar and crass by the officers of the legion, and worse still by merchants, who often make warding and appeasement symbols at the mention of the force that keeps them honest.

When Do You Use It

Soldiers use it regularly for every slight, or hurt. Officers use it sparingly - preferring to savor the name like a curse to inflict on one’s enemies. Merchants never invoke the name unless they are certain they require the mistress of vengeance and will not invoke her wraith “by mistake”.

How Do You Use It

Occasionally the words “subtile strands” or “by the left hand” are used as lesser forms, with less vehemence. When used as a battle cry it infers the forces going into battle are somehow in the right; to the legion, this princess is also the symbolism of justice and righteousness. Examples:

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

Fortune And Glory /Strength And Honor

Common Definition

This is the start of a doubled response. It refers to the last things a legionnaire gains in his career. Fortune refers to the land grant and monies allotted to him at his retirement. Glory comes from serving in the legion for 6 terms (24 years).

History Of The Proverb

Strength and Honor is the standard response to Fortune and Glory. Strength refers to the fortitude it takes to serve faithfully, although many believe it refers to physical strength and endurance. Honor refers to the ability to keep one’s word and serve well.

The first part is a wish for ling life (to live until retirement) and the second is a statement of fact (by being a statement of what currently exists). Most assume this wish of long life and prosperity originates from the Corani Empire, but there is no proof of such a thing. The saying was very common in the late 600s, falling from use for about 20 years. It has recently become common once more, primarily thanks to Triberties Linari Primus Kronos and his recent successes against Kandian forces.

Non-legionnaires do not use this saying at all.

When Do You Use It

Rarely used as a battle-cry - it is instead used in greeting fellow legionnaires and wishing them success in an upcoming venture/battle without relying on fate or invoking a princess in vain.

It is also used to replace what might be an overly emotional moment between friends in the legion. Soldiers who greet their commanding officers with the saying are seen as being facetious. However commanding officers who greet their soldiers with it are seen as good men and women, very down to earth.

How Do You Use It

Traditionally only half the line is said. Most soldiers will let their commanders say the first part, and reply with the second. Some soldiers clasp arms, while others salute when saying it.

There is no salute or formalized body posture to go with the saying; although most make a fist with the right hand and, with it tap their breast.

Note: Triberties Linari Primus Kronos only uses the “Strength and Honor” part and expects to have all his soldiers reply with the same. He is an exception to the rule as most legionnaires believe to not follow the call with the traditional response to be horribly bad luck.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

A Mile Is A Season

Common Definition

Some tasks seem to take for ever to complete. It is easier, therefore, if the task is divided and sub-divided again into smaller, more obtainable tasks. Such tasks are never pleasant, but are rarely life-threatening. When faced with such tasks, this proverb is the most-often quoted. It refers to the fact that the physical (a mile) has a time limit (a season), and that all things do end.

History Of The Proverb

Legionnaires tend to spend what spare time they have among their duties in paving roads. This long and arduous process creates stable stone-paved road beds believed to last for hundreds of years. The saying comes from the fact that, when the legion works at a regular pace, they should be able to accomplish at least a mile within a season (4 months).

The proverb is credited to Jaserak Molorn, the legion’s first Milities Fabrica and respected engineer. It was he who determined the rate at which the paved roads would grow, much to the disgust of most legionnaires.

Unfortunately the proverb is now as common as road-building. Every legionnaire is introduced to it early, as it is a favorite of instructors in boot-camp. It is only when they graduate and move to a posting do the trainees hear it from equal ranked soldiers as a lament or a gripe; and that’s when it seems to gain popularity.

When Do You Use It

Most often heard being said by older legionnaires to the new recruits, it is used as a reprimand for the impatient. Occasionally it is also used in bad weather when the legionnaires must stand wall duty, or perform other onerous tasks. It is considered bad form to say it in front of the officer who gave you the onerous task to perform, although said officer may say it without worry.

How Do You Use It

It is used as a gripe, a reprimand for impatience and a lament. Whenever there is a long, boring or odorous task to perform, chances are someone will say it. Socially it is rarely taken well as it is too easy to overuse the statement. And if a legionnaire is not suffering alone, his fellows probably do not want to be reminded that their task will end... eventually.

Note: A common retort to this saying is to remind the talker that (a) that’s a boot-camp saying, and (b) they must be old. The retorts are about as popular as the proverb.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

A Sword Cuts Both Ways

Common Definition

All legionnaires train with real weapons and injuries in practice are not uncommon. This proverb reminds recruits that you can die by your own weapon, even by your own hand. It is most often used to describe a task that is as dangerous as it is rewarding, such as political affiliations or subterfuge. Usually it is used when referring to something destined to get the legionnaires more money.

History Of The Proverb

The proverb is very old, and its origins are unknown. While most assume it relates to short-sword practice, something in which most legionnaires partake, it probably relates to all forms of double-edged weapons. In the legion it is most often heard in boot-camp - as a practical reminder of the danger of wielding weapons.

Other groups have picked up the more political aspects of the motto. As with most legion sayings, the proverb has been passed from legionnaire to non-legionnaire through families using it both in and out of the legion.

When Do You Use It

It is a reminder to exercise caution, and is most often used by commanding officers to soldiers. Only a Primus (and an old one at that) could safely say it to his commanding officer. Any other soldier who tried would likely find themselves practicing things that require extreme caution.

When outside the legion, almost anyone can use it and receive, at worst, a dirty look. Because it is usually some form of warning or reprimand, it is rarely - if ever, well received.

How Do You Use It

There are many situations in how it can be used, but most end up saying it without shortening it or modifying it in any way.

The most popular (and accepted) method is to refer to a seemingly simple task with grand political repercussions.

Examples:

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder

Common Definition

Most all legionnaires train with their shields as both an offensive and defensive weapon. While many legionnaires prefer to charge with tower shields when they can, they quickly learn this only works if you have the mass and the speed to bowl over your opponent. In addition legionnaires learn early that if you do not take care of your weapons and equipment, it will fail you at the most inopportune or expensive moment.

History Of The Proverb

The Auxillari were called into service unexpectedly, and all the locals were sent scurrying home to collect arms, armor and equipment last seen in the spring. Of the many who reassembled in the town square, one man was loath to step forward.

The Compart aimed at him by his vary shirking of his place in line, strode forth demanding to see the legionnaire’s equipment. He was shown a rusty spear and a broken shield. The Compart nodded, but did not reprimand him. Instead he promised the man would lead the battle. The man was proud to take such a position, and gladly accepted.

The next day he met the opposing force as the first in the line. The enemy spear went straight through his tattered shield, and his own sword broke atop his opponents head. He fell and was crushed by his own force, racing into battle behind him.

The moral? Those stupid enough to rely on broken shields in battle soon learn they have no protection at all.

When Do You Use It

The story is often told in boot-camp and by Compartes when they review the Auxillari. A legionnaire spends much of his free time oiling, sharpening and caring for his weapons. Those who don’t receive this saying as a reprimand. In the past decade the term has also come to be used as an excuse. In answering the question “Where were you” or more often “Why are you late” the answer is “A shield is only as good as his wielder”. It has come to mean any time taken with appearance, equipment, armor or clothing.

How Do You Use It

The saying in the legion is a reprimand for those who shirk their duties in keeping their equipment, arms and armor prepared. Outside the legion it is a saying of vanity. Anyone late because of the time spent in preparations of hair, make-up or clothes often use it to mean “you get what you wait for” or “I am worth waiting for” rather than its original meaning.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

Standard Fare

Common Definition

Quite often it is used when referring to meals eaten at inns and taverns that were less than appealing. It can also refer to any aspect of life that is not very exciting (actions, items, people, etc.). A synonym for boring or banal that is simultaneously sub-standard or less than appreciated.

It is also used to mean that something given for free is not worth anything or worth its price.

History Of The Proverb

Every legionnaire receives the same amount of food each day for free from the legion. This is called “Standard Fare” in polite company and while it will keep a legionnaire alive, it takes considerable cooking skill to make it appetizing.

When Do You Use It

Legionnaires tend to use it to define anything boring or banal.

Non-legionnaires tend to misunderstand and assume it refers to something standard or average; and not something substandard. Even among families of legionnaires, the saying tends not to be regularly used.

Using regarding an item currently under negotiations is considered to be a very low comment which will make the other person in the negotiations jump to the item’s defense.

If you wish to greatly insult a merchant on his or her wares, or a craftsman on his or her art, this phrase is the epitome of insults.

How Do You Use It

There are several ways it can be used, depending on the topic of conversation and the level of insult you wish to deliver.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

A Man’s Season/A Woman’s Season

Common Definition

It is a reference to time that is seemingly endless or a time that passed very quickly. It usually refers to four years, the length of the mandatory tour of duty in the legion; but it can also be used to mean multiple tours. Bonded craftsmen use it to refer to the total number of years required for a large project when negotiating fees and prices.

The phrase, available to both genders, is a mark of pride for those who have served, although it also used with scorn and ridicule by those who disbelieve in the benefits of the legion.

History Of The Proverb

Every legionnaire begins their career by serving 4 years. Once served, the legionnaire is considered an adult.

When Do You Use It

Commonly it is used to refer to a period of time of approximately 4 years or ones full tour of duty in the legion.

Occasionally it is used to refer to a time of strife of indeterminate length - usually by someone who never served in the legion.

How Do You Use It

How it is used depends primarily upon who is using it. Examples:

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

By Voice And Coin

Common Definition

This turn of phrase refers to vice (voice) and crime (coin); the two most common ways to acquire money in the legion. The phrase can be said together as well as apart.

When said apart (by voice, by coin) it usually refers to the method in which the subject was done. Anything done by voice is done through negotiations.

Anything done by coin is purchased or put another way is done by someone else because they were paid (usually by the speaker) to perform the task.

It is not a recommended phrase to be used near any Halean, for it is considered a slight on their church, if not the Very Heavenly Lady, herself.

History Of The Proverb

Believed to be a mistaken quotation, it was made popular by Senator Cobar Nordaka in his many attacks in the senate on Clan Wytel and their allies. Senator Nordaka is fond of saying that Clan Wytel got where it is By Voice and Coin. While this sounds very nice, it is often said with such dripping sarcasm the meaning was lost on only the dullest of listeners.

The insult was first cast in 717TR and has only become more popular since.

When Do You Use It

Short of two thieves complimenting each other on jobs well done, it is always an insult; all be it a pleasantly worded one. Although Tharda is renowned for being “corrupt” when compared to the neighboring feudal countries, no one likes to be called a thief.

How Do You Use It

The phrase is being used in a wide variety of ways, especially in the provinces of Coranan and Shiran. Out of the larger cities, however, it is mostly unknown.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

By The Temptress’s [body part]

Common Meaning

The Temptress is the most benign of names for the goddess Halea. Since her church promotes the use of her name, her various titles (official and non) are frequently used as curses and exclamations; supposedly of joy, although it can be said in mild anger without rebuke.

Other common titles for the Temptress include:

History Of The Proverb

Halea likes to be first in all things, although her church requires only lip-service and coinage to accept worshipers. So long as the worshiper prays and pays Halea first, they may and often do worship other deities.

Unlike with other gods, saying Halea’s name or any of her titles, is said to be lucky. Invoking her name often, shows a favoritism that she will appreciate and, the invoker hopes, bless.

When Do You Use It

Anywhere, any time and in any situation.

Note: Mention of the words: Bosom, Butt, Nipple and Buttock do not... go over well in high society; although they are legion favorites.

How Do You Use It

Legionnaires, the drunk and the merry tend to come up with the best renditions of this saying. Not all are acceptable in high society.

And so on, and so on...

1: Any body part will do, but if being specific always invoke the Right side. The left side is believed to be the hand of Sardura. It’s best not to get them confused.

2: Kissed yes. Sealed no. Sealed would be Bargains and it is never good to confuse the Temptress with her handmaidens.

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

By The Deceiver’s [action]

Common Meaning

The Deceiver is the nicest of the titles of Naveh; evil god of chaos, corruption, nightmares, thieves and assassins. His church is banned or downright outlawed throughout most all of Hârn. Still, he does have followers. In Tharda there are ceremonies and rituals to keep the dark god away.

The Deceiver is invoked usually in anger or in reference to an evil event.

History Of The Proverb

The church, while banned, is not forgotten. Most thefts, assassinations and other evil acts committed upon the righteous are blamed on him. He is a trickster at best and his actions are never to be trusted. Most assume the Deceiver has temples in most large settlements and his association with the Lia-Kavir[3] is well known.

Sayings using The Deceiver are very old. Translations from older languages contain as many references to these sayings as one hears in the streets of any city today. Only the most pious try to avoid saying such things as they are, to Peonians at least, the most foul curses anyone can cast without casting them upon a specific person.

3: A Thieves Guild of a sort. The name means Our Family Amongst Us.

When Do You Use It

Carefully.

How Do You Use It

Invoking the Deceiver’s name is always dangerous. Most assume, if invoked, the speaker does not believe his or her luck could get any worse. Some examples:

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

Other Sayings of Note

Legionnaires are inventive in their inflections and the above is only a small sampling. Other common epitah’s, war cries and comments are derived from Clan Mottos and Legion Mottos, listed below.

Clan Mottos

Clan Mottos are often shortened into battle cries and are always used to identify soldiers from the same clan in times of need.Proverbs are easily derived from the mottos, but seem to differ in meaning and method depending on with which branch of the family one speaks.

These mottos, along with the clan crests are registered at the Palace of Gules in the City of Coranan.

To add to the “latin” feel of Tharda, I’ve chosen latin mottos for the clans. A wonderful list of such things is available at the following web-site:
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/michael_haggerty/latin.htm

Clan Motto
Quinda Vivere est cogitare. To live is to think.
Rodal Audemus iura nostra defendere We dare defend our rights
Seris Justitia omnibus Justice to all
Smenther Ad astra per aspera To the stars through difficulties
Sosaldas Virtute et armis By valor and arms
Sudanava Crescit eundo It grows as it goes
Sudela Excelsior Ever upward
Tamel Esse quam videri To be rather than to seem
Onaxis Sapere aude! Dare to be wise!
Orde Semper idem. Always the same.
Ostardas Unus multorum. One of many.
Pesed Vae victis! Woe to the conquered!
Polivar Variatio delectat There's nothing like change!
Onaxis Sapere aude! Dare to be wise!
Orde Semper idem. Always the same.
Ostardas Unus multorum. One of many.
Pesed Vae victis! Woe to the conquered!
Polivar Variatio delectat There's nothing like change!
Aeb Accipere quam facere praestat injuriamIt is better to suffer an injustice than to do an injustice.
Akain Arte et Marte.With peaceful effort and warlike feats.)
Aquil Beneficium accipere libertatem est vendere.To accept a favour is to sell freedom.
Asarn Who Catches the Wind
Baral Concordia parvae res crescunt, discordia maximae dilabuntur.Through unity the small thing grows, through disunity the largest thing crumbles.
Cadrune Cui bono? To whose profit?
Calasain Cum grano salis With a grain of salt
Chebelos De nihilo nihil. Nothing comes from nothing.
Cosele Dictum, factum. Said and done.
Daglen Dira necessitas. The dire necessity.
Derster Labor omnia vincit. Labour conquers everything.
Dethale Docendo discimus. We learn by teaching.
Elbrin Dum spiro, spero. While I breathe, I hope.
Elernin Exitus acta probat. The result validates the deeds.
Emylis Imperium et libertas. Empire and liberty.
Erelun In spiritu et veritate In spirit and truth
Erm In vino veritas In wine is truth
Exenion Ispsa scientia potestas est. Knowledge is power.
Farabar Ira furor brevis est. Anger is a brief insanity.
Gelber Libertas inaestimabilis res est. Liberty is a thing beyond all price.
Gyben Lupus in fabula The wolf in the tale (i.e. speak of the wolf, and he will come)
Halan Mater artium necessitas. Necessity is the mother of invention.
Herthel Medicus curat, natura sanat. The physician treats, nature cures.
Holsine Medio tutissimus ibis. You will go safest in the middle.
Horla Melius est praevenire quam praeveniri. Better to forestall than to be forestalled.
Indrash Melius frangi quam flecti. It is better to break than to bend.
Irdime Mens agitat molem. The mind moves the matter.
Jeredosta Conquer the Unconquerable
Kainel Mirabile dictu. Wonderful to relate.
Kardan Nam et ipsa scientia potestas es. Knowledge is power.
Khonary Natura abhorret a vacuo. (Horror vacui.) Nature abhors the void. (The fear of the void.)
Kosawhyne Necessitatis non habet legem. Necessity knows no law.
Krenna Ne quid nimis. Nothing in excess.
Kynest Nil desperandum! Never despair!
Lamrend Non multa, sed multum. Not many, but much.
Leverl Non omnis moriar. I will not die entirely.
Luridel Nosce te ipsum. Know thyself
Mariam Nulla regula sine exceptione. No rule without exception.
Massith Numquam non paratus. Never unprepared.
Melvoen Oderint, dum metuant. May they hate me, if only they fear me.
Molorn Imak Sicker We Make Sure
Musbern Pacta sunt servanda. Agreements are to be kept.
Nemirina Periculum in mora. Danger in delay
Nordaka Prosper
Omlin Quem di diligunt adolescens moritur. He whom the gods love dies young.
Tholta Labor omnia vincit Labour conquers everything
Turistas Dum spiro spero While I breathe, I hope
Ulter Multis e gentibus vires From many peoples, strength
Utreth Ad augusta per angusta Achievement through effort
Vanthes Concordia Harmony
Weijik Audace Fortuna Juvat Fortune Favors the Brave
Wytel Indicit Scyllam qui vult vitare Charybdin. He falls into Scylla's hands who wants to avoid Charybdis.
Yemala Fortis et liber Strong and free

Legion Proverbs | The First Coin | Sardura | Fortune And Glory / Strength And Honor | A Mile Is A Season | A Sword Cuts Both Ways | A Shield Is Only As Good As Its Wielder | Standard Fare | A Manís Season/ A Womanís Season | By Voice And Coin | By The Temptressís [body part] | By The Deceiverís [action] | Other Sayings of Note

This page was last updated on August 13, 2002
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